Sunday, April 29

Happy Anniversary!

I've been having some connection challenges the past few days, so I'm almost belated with this post but not quite - I've still got an hour until midnight here on the US Pacific Coast.


Five years ago, today - April 29, 2002, Jay Cross made the first official post to Learning Circuits Blog.




Welcome to the Learning Circuits Blog!

A blog (short for web-log) lets you post a few sentences -- you don't have to puff up an observation into an article to post it. Blogs are spontaneous and informal. Also, there's no delay between writing an item and posting it on the web. A group of us are experimenting here, dropping thought-fragments and opinions into our group blog. If we're successful, you'll begin coming to the Learning Circuits Blog for late-breaking news.

For more about blogs, here's the article about learning blogs that appeared in Learning Circuits last week.

I'll ask our initial bloggers to begin by telling us who they are, what interests them, and their URLs.




The list of Jay's friends who joined him on his experiment with a new technology included Clark Aldrich, Peter Isackson, Tom Barron, Kevin Wheeler, Ellen Wagner, Clark Quinn, and Margaret Driscoll.  Both Clarks, Peter and Jay are still consistent contributors to Learning Circuits Blog five years later. 


LCB was an outgrowth of Jay's person website and blog efforts.  He linked up with ASTD's Learning Circuits Magazine to experiment with a new technology.  LCB's affiliation with Learning Circuits continues to this day.  It's been a unique relationship as we draw upon each other's connections and knowledge but ASTD has allowed LCB 100% freedom in editorial direction - allowing it to truly be a blog.


LCB has seen some lean times and some great successes.  Sam Adkins' We Are the Problem:  We're Selling Snake Oil post on November 17, 2003 rocked the elearning world.  It drew 60 comments when LCB had been averaging just over 2 per post at that point.  


In January of 2005, it was my great fortune to have Jay ask me to take over the reins of  Learning Circuits Blog.  It's been great experience thus far and only promises to be just as stimulating and exciting as we move forward.


We will begin our 6th year of publishing thought provoking content on the internet by trying to expand on the success of the feature Tony Karrer guided into existence last October - The Big Question.  With The Big Question, we found a way to involve more of our community and make LCB a dynamic hub of networked activity.  It's been exciting to see over 60 learning professionals step forward and publish posts as part of The Big Question in our first 7 months of the feature.  The conversations have been stimulating and authentic.


You'll read in the next few days how we're planning to change LCB and how you can help.  By 2012 and our tenth anniversary, LCB will be radically different than it is today, just as those first few posts seem archaic in light of today's blogosphere.


But then it wouldn't be true to the experimental nature of LCB's birth if we didn't pursue change, now would it?


Thank you to everyone who's been a part of the first five years of Learning Circuits Blog!


Dave, your humble blogmeister


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3 comments:

jay said...

Thanks for posting this, Dave. And thanks to you, Tony, and the authors of LCB for making something good better.

Five years! Time flies.

Blogging was not widely known when we started. The term "blog" was less than a year old. Getting people to comment was like pulling teeth.

Comments? Huh?

Tim Wang said...

Wow, 5 years, that's some good dedication... Congrats!

Nigel Paine said...

Five years ago I was just stepping out gingerly into the world of internal corporate blogging at the BBC and helping Euan Semple and his team bring their dream into reality. Through the teeth of IT staff opposition and indifference we made it happen. Now the 300 odd bloggers and their 8-10,000 readers just take the whole thing for granted.

Well done Euan for wanting this more than a wanting a quiet life.