Monday, December 1

Learn about Learning - 2008

We are going to continue a tradition in the Big Question ...

The Big Question for December is:

What did you learn about learning in 2008?


If you are a blogger, I would highly recommend taking this as an opportunity to go back through your blog posts over the year and looking for any "aha moments" or highlight the posts that you think were the best/most interesting.

You might want to look back at some discussions going on during the last two yearly recaps:

January's Topic:

Predictions for learning in 2009

How to Respond:

Option 1 - Simply put your thoughts in a comment below.

Option 2 -

Step 1 - Post in your blog (please link to this post).
Step 2 - Put a comment in this blog with an HTML ready link that I can simply copy and paste (an HTML anchor tag). I will only copy and past, thus, I would also recommend you include your NAME immediately before your link. So, it should look like:

Tony Karrer - e-Learning 2.0

or you could also include your blog name with something like:

Tony Karrer - e-Learning 2.0 : eLearningTechnology

Posts so far (and read comments as well):

38 comments:

Jeff Goldman said...

Jeff Goldman - What I have Learned

Michael Hanley said...

Well now there's a coincidence... I celebrated The E-learning Curve Blog's first anniversary recently, and I reflected on this topic, including my Top 10 Posts for 2008.

Topic that received most reaction?
- Economic downturn and the challenge to e-learning

Post that was most fun to write?
- E-Learning and the Economic Downturn: A Salutary Lesson

Michael Hanley - A Year in E-Learning: One Blog’s Progress

Catherine Lombardozzi said...

I, too, was a day ahead of you on this topic... here's a link to my post, which was as much a look ahead as a look back.
http://learningjournal.wordpress.com/2008/11/29/musings-toward-new-years-resolutions/

Pacquiao VS De La Hoya FREE Live Stream said...

I learned several things! Too many that I can't recall them all.

George said...

i would say elearning is more within the reach of the learning community now. Previously, all the talk seemed a little far fetched and technical, with "e-learning systems" costing thousands of dollars being implemented by some obscure university technical committee.

now however, there are some very practicable tools, and priced in such a way, that a group of students and their teacher, or a class can get togather and start gaining from technology. For example in my class we used a web based collaboration software called HyperOffice for setting up a "virtual learning space", which we can set up near instantly. this is a place where we can store and share documents and files related to our class, upload homework, put up class schedules and events, put up announcements, assignments and notifications, have discussions on forums, conduct class surveys etc. and the main thing is, anyone who knows the net can use it.

Clark said...

Clark Quinn - What did I learn about learning in 2008?.

Blogger In Middle-earth said...

The Baby, The Bath and The Bathwater

Karyn Romeis said...

Karyn Romeis - Oh dear, the dread annual question!

JamMasterJay said...

Oh My. Jason Allen - Nurtured Chaos

Blogger In Middle-earth said...

Having Saved the Baby

Damon Regan said...

Damon Regan - Reflecting on 2008

Ignatia/Inge de Waard said...

Ignatia/Inge de Waard - My two cents of learning during the last year.

Rupa said...

Here is my response:http://blog.thewritersgateway.com/2008/12/08/what-i-learnt-in-2008/

regards
Rupa

Katie Christo said...

Katie Christo - What have I learned about learning in 2008?

V Yonkers said...

Virginia Yonkers: Connecting 2 the World

Erin Murphy said...

Erin Murphy - What did I learn about learning in 2008

gminks said...

Adventures in Corporate Education - Big Question: What did you learn in 2008

John said...

John Zurovchak - Long Tail Learning:The Big Question December 2008

anna said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Anna Catherine said...

What did I learn in 2008? Something Clark wrote:

"I saw several recurrent threads, but the strongest one is on learning to learn" hit home for me.

At Coggno.com I've come to realize that when it comes down to it, all learning is done by oneself. Parents and teachers can help, but it's ultimately up to each learner. As all teachers know, a student can be physically present in a classroom without actually absorbing any information.

The most successful students are stamped by their peers as "over-achievers," just like they were when I was in school. What did someone with this label do to warrant so much envy and bewilderment? What motivated "over-achievers" to go above and beyond the rest in their absorption of material and willingness to go the extra mile?

Contrary to our misconceptions, it wasn't that these students were particularly brilliant or that some Harvard gene swam in their blood. "Over-achievers" understand a simple concept: you are the teacher, rather than the recipient of learning content, in your own educational experience. And in your life.

Somewhere along the way, the "over-achiever" realizes that he or she isn't merely the machine, but the one designing, driving, and tuning the car.

Tony Karrer said...

Anna - I know what you mean about growing up during a time when there was somewhat a negative perception of being a smart kid.

However, my perception based only on a very small sampling (my kids and their friends; and students when I was teaching) is that this is quite different. Maybe it's just in our town, but most kids very much look up to the smart kids. Even with the culture of "everyone is a winner" - the kids figure out who they think is smart.

I do not see the "over-achiever" stigma nearly as much. Are you really still seeing that?

Anna Catherine said...

Tony, you have a good point. The "over-achiever" students are doing much, much better these days---especially if their social skills are developed too---and you may be right that the stigma has vanished. "Geek chic" hadn't been born yet when I was in school. There are still exceptional students who don't do well socially, but that has to do with their lack of social skills, not with their braininess.

But the idea I wanted to get across is that a lot of these students, like the ones I knew destined for Tufts and Harvard, were more hard workers than they were brilliant minds. It was an attitude they had about school, rather than a natural knack for it, that was different. These students had healthy relationships with teachers, whom they treated like professional peers--respectfully, but with the consciousness that they were there to aid them in their learning experience, not as authority figures.

Kids in traditional school systems--though I think it's changing these days--still often feel like they're plugged into a system that they have little control over. And that produces poor results in their performance. We should be helping students develop a bigger perspective, and an understanding that they're in charge of their own lives and their understanding of the world.

Unfortunately, this is about the hardest task any educator (or parent) faces--trying to convey to kids and teens that though certain behaviors are unacceptable, they're in control, and though they should probably do what they're told in school, they have a choice. If a student can truly understand this, however, I think it changes everything for that student.

Ellen said...

Ellen at the aLearning Blog

Taruna Goel said...

Taruna Goel -
Learning About Learning in 2008

Kevin Marsh said...

Kevin Marsh learnt this in 2008 http://storycurve.blogspot.com/2008/12/what-i-learned-in-2008.html

LearnNuggets - Kevin Thorn said...

5 Things I learned in 2008.

koichi said...

I learned about education, and what a bunch of education startups are working on. Recently, I met virtually with people at eduFire, TeachStreet, Cramster, and more at the last virtual eduConference. It's great to see what everyone else is doing, and where the future of education is heading!

Informixx said...

Definitely I learned many things... Too many that I can't remember it all.

Tony Karrer said...

Informixx - there's value in going back and doing at least some level of inventory of what you learned. Or taken another way, that's a cop out. :)

globetrottingkerry said...

Kerry... what I've learned

Rene Meijer said...

Rene Meijer - My learning disabilities

UFC 92 Live Online said...

There are many things which I learned throughout this year.

Manish Mohan said...

Manish Mohan - What I learned in 2008

Clive Shepherd said...

Clive Shepherd: http://clive-shepherd.blogspot.com/2008/12/big-question-what-did-you-learn-about.html

christytucker said...

Hey, I didn't want Clive to have to be the last one posting. :)

Christy Tucker: What I Learned This Year

Geetha Krishnan said...

Geetha Krishnan: 2008: Low on Learning

Ingrid O'Sullivan said...

Ingrid O'Sullivan - What did I learn in 2008? Lots..

Anonymous said...

^^ nice blog!! ^@^

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